circ1Dorothy Molter was the last non-indigenous resident of the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW). After her passing in 1986, her homestead was dismantled in 1987 and transported by dogsled and snowmobile to Moose Lake, and then on to Ely where volunteers restored two of her cabins at the current site of the Dorothy Molter Museum.

Nestled in a quiet grove of pines, just outside of Ely, Minnesota, are the cabins and museum of one of the north wood’s dearest and most colorful individuals, Dorothy Molter. Some remember her fondly as the “Root Beer Lady” while others recall her as the “Nightingale of the Wilderness” or, simply, Dorothy.

Dorothy carved out her legacy in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness (BWCAW) located within the Quetico-Superior National Forest. Dorothy lived on the Isle of Pines on Knife Lake for more than 56 years where she paddled, hiked, fished, skied and snowshoed this pristine area, until her death in 1986. She was visited by as many as 7,000 people a year.

We invite you to learn more about Dorothy Molter through our website, visiting our museum in Ely, Minnesota or becoming a museum member to receive our newsletter and invites to special events.